Why I started Kinetic Dx

Coaching my son's soccer team with my husband was a fantastic experience, and made me appreciate the value of a proper warm up.

Coaching my son's soccer team with my husband was a fantastic experience, and made me appreciate the value of a proper warm up.

One of the most common questions I get is “why did you start Kinetic Dx?”  There are so many reasons that sometimes I give slightly different answers just to be crisp and clear at any one point it time. I am so passionate about this company that I could talk for a very long time about how and why I envisioned it.  Here are a few of the things that motivated me to get Kinetic Dx off the ground.

First of all, I am a genetic counselor. I love genetics and cutting edge science, and I love helping people. I’ve been fortunate to see the field of genetics evolve from something that was useful to a few people with rare problems to a robust field that can help anyone with basic questions of health. I’ve been involved with commercializing genetic testing for medications (pharmacogenetics), which helps doctors and consumers understand the best medications and doses to use for certain clinical indications. It was an easy transition from pharmacogenetics into wellness, using genetic information to help understand inherited risks for common disease such as diabetes and heart disease. I worked on projects in prior companies such as Labcorp, DNA Direct, and Medco using genetics in wellness programs. I saw first hand how these programs provided early interventions, increased motivation, and helped reduce disease.

Genetic testing also changed my life.  I struggle with my weight and blood pressure.  It started in my twenties, and at first I thought it was the usual “freshman 15” that plagues many college students. At first if my weight went up, I would diet and hit the gym or add a new activity, and I would get back to where I wanted to be.  As I got older and had three pregnancies, the weight and blood pressure issues got out of control, and dieting and exercise had less of an effect.  I spent thousands of dollars on personal trainers, nutritional programs, and on trying all the fads. I also ignored my doctor’s advice about taking blood pressure meds- I thought if I just worked harder at the diet and exercise, I could bring my blood pressure down. I felt I was just too young to have high blood pressure! Then I went through the most stressful period in my life; new baby, new job, moving coast to coast twice, my mother passing, and two accidents resulting in injuries that made me sedentary for about two years.  When I healed and tried to get back into working out, I tore my Achilles tendon. During that difficult time I was very down on myself, and felt like I hadn’t tried the right things or made the right choices. Other people lost weight, got strong, and made healthy strides, I had to be doing something wrong.  Then I had a few important realizations. Most importantly, I had forgotten to apply my genetic counseling knowledge to my own medical history. Having early onset of disease, like high blood pressure, that is typically associated with older age, is a sign of a genetic component at play. Failure to respond to treatment, such as medically supervised diet and exercise, is also a sign of genetic influence. So I took my high blood pressure pills, which made me feel fantastic, and I went digging in my own genome. There I discovered that I have multiple risk factors. I carry a genetic variant that is associated with a poorer, longer response to exercise for increasing muscle strength and combating metabolic syndrome. I also have a variant associated with Achilles tendinopathy. If I had known of this variant, I would have done some ankle stability work before just jumping back into my work out regimen after being sedentary.

I also discovered that I have a rare genetic variant for an inherited syndrome called Abdominal Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome (AOMS), Type III.  All at once, all of my struggles were explained. Most importantly though, I was able to appreciate that my hard work actually did pay off, I was just looking at the wrong outcomes.  Originally I wanted to fit into a certain size clothing and do extreme activities like American Ninja Warrior, but now I appreciate that without my attention to diet and exercise, I would probably have diabetes and coronary artery disease by now. Members of my biological family have had gastric bypass surgery by my age, and that is not a procedure that I will need.

So all of that, and a little more that I’ll leave for another blog, is why I started Kinetic Dx. I don’t want people to tear their Achilles tendon, or suffer any other preventable injuries, if there is something they can do about it. I don’t want people to feel like a failure if they aren’t making the same progress they see in others at the gym or in sports or in weight loss. I believe genetic testing can help people find their zone, and I hope that this knowledge motivates people to focus on their personal best-not someone else’s- and that we all just keep moving together.

Shoulder or Knee Injury: What to prepare for when playing golf.

Arnold Palmers recent decision to not take part in the ceremonial tee shot at this year’s Masters Tournament due to shoulder injury, shows how golfers are prone to injuries just like any other professional athlete.  A lot of golfers are playing hurt.  Whether it be tendinitis, sore muscles, or arthritis, golfers tend to stay off the course to heal rather than focus on neuromuscular exercises to prevent such injuries.

As Jack Nicklaus famously said, “Professional golfers condition to play golf; amateur golfers play golf to condition.”  Its not a mystery that a majority of amateur golfers will sustain a significant injury due to poor physical health, bad golf mechanics, or inadequately warming up.  Its even worse for professional golfers who swing at 400-500 balls a day.

The truth is there is no one type of injury to prepare for when playing golf.  Whether it be elbow, wrist, or lower back, it all depends on how you practice and exercise.  But having a detailed look into your body’s chemistry can help you focus on areas that are more prone to golf injuries.  That’s where genomic profiling and blood chemistry analysis come in.  For example, genetic predisposition to maladies like arthritis can influence your recovery time.

Research shows that humans vary in both physical and mental abilities, and a good portion of that variation is due to an individual’s genetic makeup. In addition, there is evidence that familial factors also contribute to variability in training response.  In other words, golfers like any other professional athlete, differ in the time it takes to train.

So the next time you are out on the golf course, don’t get distracted by whether your shoulder will hurt by the end of the day, or whether you haven’t practiced long enough to compete.  Stay focused on the game and your next swing by taking precautionary steps to exercise and train the way your genomic profile tells you to.

Vitamin D-An Athlete's New Best Friend?

Many athletes, whether they are casual, “weekend warriors”, or professionals, are discovering new information on an old essential compound – vitamin D.  Vitamin D is an important vitamin that helps people absorb calcium.  It is widely known that calcium is critical for bone density.  There is growing evidence that vitamin D may have many benefits to athletes, especially when it comes to injury prevention.

Vitamin D can be found in many foods including fish, fortified milk, and different cereals.  Our bodies naturally produce vitamin D when exposed to the sun.  Studies have shown that our vitamin D levels fluctuate with the seasons.  Naturally, vitamin D goes down in the winter and rises in the summer.  People who spend much of their time inside or have darker-pigmented skin are at risk to be vitamin D deficient.

Sports nutritionists have recently taken notice of vitamin D.  Professional sports teams like the Pittsburgh Steelers, New York Giants, and Detroit Red Wings have all monitored vitamin D in their players.  Even universities, such as the University of Southern California, are starting to test vitamin D levels in their athletes.  If someone is deficient in vitamin D, they can be on a vitamin D-rich diet or supplement using pills.

So why all the fuss about vitamin D?  Recent data has shown a tangible benefit to increasing vitamin D levels in people who are deficient, including an increase in proximal strength and a decrease in stress fractures.  Vitamin D benefits immunity as well.  The opposite is true for those who are lacking vitamin D.  One study showed athletes with bone fractures are found to have low vitamin D levels.  This same study found that those who experienced injury or poor performance on a competitive sports team had lower vitamin D than those who actually made the team.

Kinetic Dx (KDx) is as committed to peak athletic performance as their customers.  Data clearly states knowing your vitamin D is the first step to knowing if you are deficient.  Fortunately, KDx has a test that checks specifically for vitamin D and calcium, to know if supplementation is needed.  This test may be performed at different times of the year, so athletes can increase or decrease their vitamin D intake with seasonal changes.  There is also genetic testing available that directly impacts vitamin D metabolism.  Some athletes may have a genetic predisposition to being vitamin D deficient.  In these cases, vitamin D supplementation is even more critical.

Many sports teams, college athletic programs, and sports medicine societies are experiencing how vitamin D, or the lack thereof, can positively or negatively impact athletic performance and sports injuries.  Kinetic Dx has a multitude of tests for those who want to take their competitive edge to the next level.  Most importantly, testing provides actionable information to assist athletes in optimizing their abilities.

 

References:

  • Girgis CM, Clifton-Bligh RJ, Hamrick MW, Holick MF, Gunton JE. Endocr Rev. 2013 Feb;34(1):33-83
  • von Hurst PR, Beck KL. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2014 Nov;17(6):539-45.
  • Neal S, Sykes J, Rigby M, Hess B. Phys Sportsmed. 2015 May;43(2):161-8.
  • Stockton KA, Mengersen K, Paratz JD, Kandiah D, Bennell KL.  2011 Mar;22(3):859-71.

What's Behind The Golden State Warriors Amazing Start?

The Golden State Warriors came into the 2015-2016 season on fire and set a new record for most wins to start a season with a record of 24-0. The previous record was 15-0 back in 1948-1949 by the Washington Capitals and then tied in 1993-1994 with the Houston Rockets. Much of this success is attributed to the outstanding performances put on by last season’s MVP, Stephen Curry, and great interim coaching from Luke Walton. However, at the base of all this is the fact that they have what can be considered a “healthy” team, something that is just uncommon these days in professional level sports.

Injuries plague professional level teams with players getting injured during practice, during games, and in training. Combine the level of physical demand with the constant traveling schedule to play in the NBA and you have a recipe for disaster. Lebron James, widely considered to be one of the best that the sport of basketball has ever seen, recently made an interesting point on the success of the Golden State Warriors. "They've been healthy. They've been the most healthy team I've ever seen in NBA history, and they have great talent. Those guys all play for one common goal and that's to win, and that's all that matters." Having played the Warriors in the 2014-2015 finals he knows what it is like to face a top team firing on all cylinders. Cleveland entered last season’s finals without 3 key players: Kyrie irving, Anderson Varajeo and Kevin Love. The burden was placed almost entirely on James to get the Cavaliers through the series and it showed. By the end of the series Lebron James, who was forced to play the majority of each game with very little rest, was exhausted and the Warriors won games 4,5 and 6 with comfortable leads in regular time, also earning them the championship.

Injuries have carried over to the current season for the Cavaliers who are missing 4 of their top 8 guys: Kyrie Irving (left knee), Iman Shumpert (right wrist), Timofey Mozgov (right shoulder) and Mo Williams (right ankle). The Warriors, in comparison, are only down Thompson to an ankle injury. While it may not seem like the injuries are affecting the Cavaliers because they are leading the Eastern Conference, comparing the records of the 2 teams (16-8 versus 24-1 for the Cavaliers and Warriors respectively) you see the difference between having an elite player and having a dominant team.

How will things progress as the season goes on? If the past is any indicator, team health will be the key to winning the championship. The Warriors run unfortunately came to a halt last weekend when they suffered a loss to the Milwaukee Bucks, but the occasional bad showing is to be expected. The Cavaliers are also set to have Kyrie Irving back in the lineup this week. With both teams leading their respective conferences we would see the two clash again in the NBA Finals. We will see who is the healthier team this time around.

Connect the Dots with the KDx Genetic Profile

Your body is a vault of blueprints and guidelines for how you should train. And training without this information is like riding a bike with the seat too high. Yeah, it’ll work but it won’t be right. The KDx Genetic Profile helps unlock your full training potential.

How the KDx Genetic Profile Works:

  • Examines 56 genetic variations tied to athletic performance and injuries
  • Provides an overview of your body’s unique attributes
  • Analyzes your unique nutritional needs

 

Photo Credit: Keith Allison

New Year’s Resolution: Know Your Athletic Performance & Training Baseline

It’s that time of year – we are all thinking about New Year’s resolutions. Maybe you have a sporting event in mind that you are training for, you’d like to beat your personal best, you want to lose weight, bulk up, or even just exercise more effectively.

Now is the perfect time to prepare for success in the New Year by determining what your current blood levels are for a number of important biomarkers – ranging from hormones, inflammation markers, lipids, and organ function.  All of these blood chemistry components are a reflection of your current health, and can help you determine things like whether your holiday fatigue is from too many cookies  or if it’s something else like low vitamin D.  Knowing your numbers before you start any new training or exercise programs allows you to better track changes that might signal training too much or not enough. And it can help motivate you to keep going when you see positive changes, such as lower cholesterol and glucose levels.

At Kinetic Diagnostics, we offer a variety of biomarker tests to help better inform your New Year’s sports performance and training resolutions. When you’re ready to establish your sports performance and training baseline, we have two tests to choose from: Baseline Biomarkers and Baseline Biomarkers Lite.

Baseline Biomarkers: This panel analyzes 38 blood chemistry components to give you insight into your blood cell count, cholesterol, sugar, liver and kidney function, vitamins, and hormones.  

Baseline Biomarkers Lite: This test analyzes 15 basic blood chemistry components to give you insight into your blood cell count, cholesterol, sugar, liver and kidney function, vitamins, and hormones.  

We’ve summarized biomarkers available in each of the baseline tests we provide at Kinetic Diagnostics. Details about each of these tests is based on information from LabTestsOnline. The first 15 are included in the Baseline Biomarkers Lite panel and all 38 are included in the Baseline Biomarkers panel. If you don’t see the combination or test in our catalog that you and/or your doctor are considering, contact us, it’s likely we have what you need.

1. BUN: The blood urea nitrogen or BUN test is primarily used to evaluate kidney function. Elevated blood urea nitrogen levels could indicate that the kidneys are not filtering waste as expected.

2. BUN+Creatinine: Creatinine is the waste product that comes from the muscles breaking down creatine. The creatinine blood test is ordered along with the blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test to assess kidney function.

3. Calcium, Serum: A total calcium level is often measured as part of a routine health screening. A blood calcium test may help screen for a range of conditions relating to the bones, heart, nerves, kidneys, and teeth.

4. Carbon Dioxide, Total: Carbon Dioxide is in the blood in the form of Bicarbonate. It is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by the kidneys. The body uses it to maintain an acid-base balance. Imbalances of bicarbonate can be a sign of kidney disease, acidosis, or metabolic alkalosis.

5. CBC/Diff: The complete blood count (CBC) with differential test for illnesses in the blood and can be an indicator of overall body health. The test provides information and measurements on the number and types of white blood cells, the number of red blood cells, the size of your red blood cells, hematocrit, hemoglobin, average red blood cell size, platelet count, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin.

6. Chloride, Serum: Chloride, a negatively charged ion, is an electrolyte that works with other electrolytes, like potassium and sodium, to regulate the amount of fluid in the body. It  is usually consumed into the body through food and table salt. Increased levels in the blood is linked with dehydration, weakness, or kidney disease.

7. Cholesterol, Total: Cholesterol is a waxy fat-like substance found in the blood. It is important to make hormones, vitamin D, and to process some foods. Too much can lead to clogged arteries and heart disease. In athletes, elevated cholesterol has been associated with conditions such as inflammation and female athlete triad syndrome.

8. Creatine Kinase,Total, Serum: Creatine Kinase is an enzyme found in the heart, brain, and skeletal muscle. When muscle is damaged increased amounts of  CK is released into the blood. The test is used to detect inflammation of muscles or muscle damage.

9. Glomerular Filtration Rate, Estimated: Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) testing measures kidney function by measuring the level of creatinine, a waste product that the kidneys filter, in the blood. In the kidney's glomeruli are tiny filters that remove waste from the blood, but allow important compounds like proteins and blood cells though. Measuring the waste in the blood through a GFR test indicates kidney health.

10. Glucose, Serum: This is a fasting glucose (sugar) test (fasting blood glucose, FBG) which measures the level of glucose in the blood after fasting for at least 8 hours. This is often part of routine health screening, and can help identify when the body may not be processing glucose as expected.

11. HDL Cholesterol: High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Cholesterol is the  "good" cholesterol, as it consists primarily of protein and a small amount of cholesterol. It carries excess cholesterol from tissues to the liver for disposal.  Low Levels of HDL Cholesterol shows a correlation with an increased risk of heart disease.

12. LDL Cholesterol (Direct): Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is also known as “bad cholesterol,” This testing is used to predict a person’s risk for the development of heart disease. Maintaining healthy levels of lipids in the body is important, but excess cholesterol like LDL-C can lead to deposits on the walls of blood vessels that can lead to further complications as more builds up.

13. Potassium, Serum: Potassium is an electrolyte that is essential is cell metabolism and muscle function. Potassium works to regulate the amount of fluid in the body and stimulates muscle contraction. These tests are ordered when evaluating high blood pressure and kidney disease.

14. Sodium, Serum: Sodium is an electrolyte that is important for nerve and muscle function. These tests are ordered in routine lab tests to determine electrolyte imbalance. An electrolyte imbalance can be associated with weakness, hyponatremia, and hypernatremia.

15. Triglycerides: Triglycerides are a form of fat and a major source of energy for the body. However, levels that are too high are associated with a risk of developing heart disease. Elevated levels can be caused by smoking, inactivity, and high calorie diets.

16. Albumin, Serum: Albumin is a form of protein produced in the liver that circulates in the blood to help maintain fluid balance in the body. It contains the nutrients and proteins required to clot blood properly in the case of bleeding. An Albumin test helps determine if you body’s liver is functioning properly.

17. Alkaline Phosphatase, S:  Alkaline Phosphatase is an enzyme found in body tissues in the liver, bone, and kidneys. Elevated levels can be signs of liver or bone disorders.

18. ALT (SGPT): Alanine aminotransferase is an enzyme found in the liver and kidney. In healthy individuals, ALT levels are low, but when the liver is damaged more ALT flows into the bloodstream.

19. Apolipoprotein B: Apolipoprotein B is a protein that helps in the metabolism of lipids by combining with them to transport them through the bloodstream. Increased levels of Apolipoprotein B are associated with those who have high cholesterol and a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

20. AST (SGOT): Aspartate aminotransferase is an enzyme most commonly found in the heart and liver. When liver or muscle cells are injured, AST is released into the blood. A damaged liver can increase AST levels so the test is used to help detect liver damage that may be due to diseases, drugs, or alcohol.

21. Bilirubin, Total: Bilirubin is a waste product of the breakdown of heme, a component of hemoglobin. Testing bilirubin levels helps diagnose conditions such as liver disease, hemolytic anemia, and bile duct blocks.

22. C-Reactive Protein, Quantitative: C- Reactive protein (CRP) is a protein made by the liver and released into the blood after tissue injury, an infection, or other inflammation. The test is used to detect inflammation as levels of CRP increase when there is inflammation in the body.

23. Cortisol: Cortisol is a hormone that plays a part in the breaking down of proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. It also works to help maintain blood pressure and regulate the body’s immune system. Cortisol testing is done to help diagnose Cushing syndrome, which can lead to weight gain and fatty deposits in the face and upper back area, and adrenal insufficiency.

24. Estradiol: Estradiol (E2) is produced in the ovaries in women and in the testicles in men. It is a primary component in reproductive organ development and function in women and bone growth in both sexes. Abnormal levels can be associated with tumors in the ovaries, testicles, or adrenal glands or the dysfunction of these glands.  

25. Ferritin, Serum: Ferritin is a protein found inside the cells that store iron. Measuring ferritin levels allows doctors to test measure the amount of iron in the blood. Iron is an essential component for red blood cell production.

26. Folate (Folic Acid), Serum: Folate helps form red blood cells and produces DNA. Low levels of Folate in the blood indicates malnutrition and poor diet.

27. Hemoglobin A1c: Hemoglobin is the protein containing iron that is found in all red blood cells. Hemoglobin allows the red blood cells to bind to oxygen in the lungs and transport it throughout the body. Testing for hemoglobin shows a correlation to red blood cell production in the body.

28. Insulin: Insulin is a hormone that is important to the transportation and storage of glucose in the body. It is made and stored in the pancreas. Low levels of insulin are seen in diabetes and pancreatic disease cases, high levels are associated with obesity and Cushing Syndrome.

29. Iron, Serum: Iron is an essential part of life. It helps form red blood cells and is a critical component of hemoglobin, helping bind oxygen in the lungs and circulate it to other areas of the body. Low levels of iron lead to chronic fatigue, weakness, and headaches.

30. Lipoprotein Lp(a): This test measures Lp(a) in the blood in order to evaluate an individual's risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Lp(a) levels remain relatively consistent over a lifespan, so changes in Lp(a) levels are an indication of risks.

31. Protein, Total, Serum: The total protein test measures the amount of albumin and globulin in the blood. Albumin proteins keep fluid from leaking out of blood vessels and Globulin proteins play an important role in your immune system. Elevated levels can be signs of viral infections or bone marrow disorders. Low protein levels can indicate liver or kidney disorder or malnutrition.

32. Testosterone, Free: Testosterone is a hormone produced by the testicles in males and the adrenal glands. Testosterone stimulates male puberty and maintaining muscle mass. Testing for free testosterone represents the fraction that circulates the blood and is a good indicator of the bioactivity of testosterone.

33. Thyroxine (T4): Thyroxine (T4) is a hormone produced by the thyroid and it plays an important role in growth and metabolism. Low T4 levels can indicate dietary issues like malnutrition, while high levels can indicate high protein levels in the blood.

34. Transferrin  Saturation: This test is used in combination with other iron tests to evaluate iron metabolism, and can be useful for endurance athletes. It can assist in determining between anemia that is caused by iron deficiency or that associated with inflammation or chronic illness. 

35. Triiodothyronine (T3): Triiodothyronine (T3) is a hormone produced by the thyroid. Low levels are associated with a slowed metabolism and can lead to weight gain, dry skin, and fatigue. High levels are associated with nervousness, weight loss, and shaky hands.

36. TSH: The thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced in the pituitary gland and it works with the thyroid gland to make and release thyroid hormones into the bloodstream.  Abnormal levels link to a problem with the pituitary gland or thyroid gland. Signs of this can be seen in weakness, difficulty sleeping, dry skin, and menstrual irregularity in women.

37. Vitamin B12: Vitamin B12 is an essential component of bodily health and is necessary for red blood cell formation, repairing tissues, DNA synthesis. It is not produced in the body and is only supplied through diet. B12 deficiency can be a sign of poor nutrition or of other issues blocking the body from properly absorbing B12 in the intestines.

38. Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy: Vitamin D is a family of compounds that are essential for the formation and growth of teeth and bones. Two forms are found in the blood, 25-hydoxyvitamin D and 1,25dihydoxyvitamin D. Vitamin D can be absorbed by the sun or ingested through food. Testing vitamin D can help determine if bone related abnormalities are related to abnormal vitamin D levels.

Ready To Uncover Your Athletic Performance & Training Baseline?



Photo Credit: Sam JR

7 Ways To Help Prevent Basketball Injuries

basketball injuries - blog post

Ankle sprains, knee injuries, foot and lower leg fractures and jammed fingers are the most common basketball injuries. In studies of basketball players five to nineteen, sprains, strains and fractures of the lower extremities, along with dislocations of the fingers, were the most common basketball injuries. Risk factors for injury include a history of past injury, improper shoe selection, and failure to stretch before practice and games4.

Not all injuries can be prevented, but good training and correct use of equipment can lower your chances to get hurt.  There is not a lot of big research on injury prevention for basketball. However, guidance from organizations like the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal & Skin Disease and the American Academy of Pediatrics supports the following practices.

  1. Schedule are-season doctor exam with a sports medicine specialist. This is an opportunity to assess your present fitness level, detect conditions that predispose you to new injuries, and evaluate existing injuries.
     
  2. Incorporate a warm up and stretch routine before practices and games. Evidence suggests that athletes should limit stretching before exercise, and increase the warm up time.
     
  3. Use protective equipment that fits well. Wearing appropriate shoes can enhance performance and prevent injuries.
     
  4. Use braces or taping to support your ankles and knees.
     
  5. Remember to rest.Don’t play organized sports year round.Be careful when playing multiple sports with overlapping seasons. Rest is important for good health and building skills.
     
  6. Proper hydration is critical. If you’re not properly hydrated, your body can’t perform at its highest level. You may experience fatigue, muscle cramps, dizziness, or more serious symptoms.
     
  7. Reduce or prevent overuse injuries with proper conditioning and strength training.Two common causes of overuse injuries are training errors and technical errors. For example, if you go too fast, exercise for too long or do too much of an activity, you can strain your muscles – that’s a training error.

Consider training programs for knee stabilization, stress fracture prevention, and improved balance.  These recommendations are based on our review of current research and expert opinion. Always consult with your doctor and sports trainer before starting any training program to ensure that it is safe and correct for you to do so. Make sure that you understand the right sports training techniques and how to use the suggested equipment.

Unlock Your Training Potential with the KDx Genetic Profile

Your body is a vault of blueprints and guidelines for how you should train. With the help of the KDx Genetic Profile, you can fine-tune your current program and make adjustments that are personalized for your own body.

How the KDx Genetic Profile Works

  • Examines 56 genetic variations tied to athletic performance & injuries
  • Provides an overview of your body’s unique attributes
  • Analyzes your unique nutritional needs

It’s easy to get started. Sign up on our website.
 

Photo credit: Keith Allison


5 Tips to Prevent Cycling Injuries

The highest risk of cycling injury is associated with things that a cyclist can directly impact. This includes improper use of cycling equipment, too much pedal resistance, and insufficient strength in the back resulting in reduced stabilization of muscles, hips, quadriceps and legs.

It’s true that not all injuries can be prevented, but good training and correct use of equipment can lower your chances of getting hurt. Research from other sports and guidance from American Academy of Pediatrics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Center for Policy Studies (UK), supports the following 5 tips to prevent cycling injuries with proper riding posture.

  1. Properly use protective safety equipment
     
  2. Pedal in lower gears to reduce pedal resistance
     
  3. Reduce or prevent overuse injuries with proper conditioning and strength training, especially in the torso,  hips, quadriceps, legs and back stabilizing muscles
     
  4. Use of padded gloves and/or handlebar tape
     
  5. Use of appropriate shoes and clip pressure

And if you’re wondering what else you can do to help prevent cycling injuries, consider a cycling training program for hamstring injury prevention, back pain prevention, neck pain prevention and knee stability. These recommendations are based on our review of current research and expert opinion. Always consult with your doctor and sports trainer before starting any training program to ensure that it is safe and correct for you to do so. Make sure that you understand the right training techniques and how to use the suggested equipment.

Connect the Dots with the KDx Genetic Profile

Your body is a vault of blueprints and guidelines for how you should train. And training without this information is like riding a bike with the seat too high. Yeah, it’ll work but it won’t be right. The KDx Genetic Profile helps unlock your full training potential.

How the KDx Genetic Profile Works

  • Examines 56 genetic variations tied to athletic performance and injuries
  • Provides an overview of your body’s unique attributes
  • Analyzes your unique nutritional needs

It’s easy to get started. Sign up on our website to order the KDx Genetic Profile. Working with a trainer? Bring your genetic profile results to your next appointment to discuss how to boost your treatment and performance goals. Now you can learn your body’s training and performance secrets – direct from the source.

 

6. Photo Credit: Tim Moreillon

7 Ways To Help Prevent Baseball Injuries

Muscle sprains, pulled ligaments, cuts and bruises are the most common overuse injuries in baseball. In studies of Major League Baseball and Little League players, pitchers had more injuries than other positions– mostly shoulder and elbow-related injuries . Other positions’ injuries were mostly ankle, hip and knee-related.

It’s true that not all injuries can be prevented, but just like we mentioned in our articles about cycling and basketball, good training and correct use of equipment can minimize your chances to get hurt.  There is not a lot of big research on injury prevention for baseball. However, guidance from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and the American Academy of Pediatrics supports the following practices:

  1. Pre-season doctor exam with sports medicine specialist.
     
  2. Warming up and stretching before practices and games.
     
  3. Use of protective equipment that fits well.
     
  4. Sticking to age appropriate rules for sliding.
     
  5. Incorporate rest periods. Don’t play organized sports year round and be careful when playing on teams or sports with overlapping seasons. Rest is important for good health and building skills.
     
  6. Follow guidelines for the number of pitches thrown per day and per games.
     
  7. Reduce or prevent overuse injuries with proper conditioning.

Think about how you can incorporate baseball training into your sports routine including programs for knees, shoulders, and elbow stabilization. These recommendations are based on our review of current research and expert opinion. You should always speak to you doctor and sports trainer before starting a training program.It’s important to understand the correct training techniques and how to use the suggested equipment.

Training Tuned To Fit Your Body

Your body is a vault of blueprints and guidelines for how you should train. With the help of the KDx Genetic Profile, you can fine-tune your current program and make adjustments that are personalized for your own body.

How the KDx Genetic Profile Works

  • Examines 56 genetic variations tied to athletic performance & injuries
  • Provides an overview of your body’s unique attributes
  • Analyzes your unique nutritional needs
  • It’s easy to get started. Sign up on our website.



Photo credit: Keith Allison


5 Tips To Prevent Golf Injuries

Lower back pain is the most common sports injuries in golfers, according to research from The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and Sports Health. This is followed by elbow, shoulder and wrist injuries. Common overuse injuries include Golfer’s elbow, rotator cuff tendinitis, knee injuries (torn meniscus, osteoarthritis, or chondromalacia), wrist pain, generalized back pain, and ECU tendon luxation.

It’s impossible to prevent all injuries, but good training and correct use of equipment can lower your chances of getting hurt. Research from the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine, supports the following practices:

  1. Increase the range of motion of the lumbar spine extension through stretching. Golfers with poor mobility may suffer in terms of generating club head speed and have an increased likelihood that they may develop compensatory adjustments to their swing – that leads to inaccuracy and injury.
     
  2. Hip rotation is important in golf. Increase rotation of your lead hip through stretching.
     
  3. There are key positions at every point in a golfer’s swing. It’s important to follow proper swing mechanics.
     
  4. Pre-round stretching and warm up. Before you do something strenuous like swinging a golf club at 100 mph, you should warm your muscles up with a series of basic movements.
     
  5. Strengthening regimens that target the shoulder, forearm, hand,  and core. For example, the role of the core stabilising muscles is to maintain a neutral position of the pelvis, spine and shoulder blades. This reduces the risk of injury and positions the body in way to facilitate optimal movement patterns while also maximizing muscle function.

If you you are thinking about starting a training program, areas to focus on include pre-golf warm up, shoulder stability, back pain prevention, elbow stability, and knee stability.  These recommendations are based on our review of current research and expert opinion. Remember to speak with your doctor and sports trainer before starting any training program to ensure that it is safe and correct for you to do so. Make sure that you understand the right training techniques and how to use the suggested equipment.

Unlock Your Training Potential with the KDx Genetic Profile

Your body is a vault of blueprints and guidelines for how you should train. With the help of the KDx Genetic Profile, you can fine-tune your current program and make adjustments that are personalized for your own body.

How the KDx Genetic Profile Works

  • Examines 56 genetic variations tied to athletic performance & injuries
  • Provides an overview of your body’s unique attributes
  • Analyzes your unique nutritional needs

It’s easy to get started. Sign up on our website.

 

Photo Credit: South African Tourism